Category Archives: Cases

Mayday! Mayday! UMG Took Us Down!!

After UMG won its MSJ (order here), Golden Eagle has apparently settled at a full fare price. According to The Hollywood Reporter, the settlement could be worth $30-40mm to UMG.

UMG’s Motion for Summary Judgment

Umg v Inflight (Umg Msj)

Global Eagle’s Response

UMG v Inflight (Inflight Res to UMG MSJ)

Judge Wu’s Tentative Order

UMG v Inflight (Order Re UMG MSJ)

Judge Wu’s Supplemental Order

UMG v Inflight (Supp Order Re UMG MSJ)

Getting Tufer

TufAmerica has discovered that it can be very expensive to bring a copyright infringement claim when you don’t own the copyright allegedly being infringed. In this case, TufAmerica sued the Beastie Boys (including their record label [UMG] and music publisher [UMPG]) over the alleged sampling of TufAmerica’s recording artist Trouble Funk’s 1982 release “Say What” on the Beastie Boy’s track “Shadrach” from their 1989 release Paul’s Boutique. Judge Nathan of the SDNY recently granted Defendant’s motions for attorneys’ fees and costs totaling nearly $850,000! Judge Nathan had earlier granted Defendant’s motion for summary judgment, finding that TufAmerica lacked standing to sue for infringement because it did not own an exclusive license to the Trouble Funk recording / musical composition at issue. Instead, Judge Nathan found that, at most, TufAmerica had acquired a “bare right to sue,” which is not an exclusive license and does not provide standing under the Copyright Act’s Sec. 501’s standing requirements.

Judge Nathan’s decision is below.

TufAmerica v Beastie Boys (Atty Fee Award)

Getting Tuf

Also from TufAmerica’s lawsuit against the Beastie Boys over the alleged sampling of TufAmerica’s recording artist Trouble Funk’s 1982 release “Say What” on the Beastie Boy’s “Shadrach” from their 1989 release Paul’s Boutique, I give you Trouble Funk’s recording contract and co-publishing agreement.

Recording Agreement

Trouble Funk Recording Contract (1984)

Co-Publishing Agreement
 

Co Publishing Agreement

Tidal Wave?

Jay Z’s Tidal is the latest interactive service to be sued for copyright infringement for failure to secure reproduction rights to musical compositions embodied in sound recordings made available to listeners / subscribers of the service. The suit specifically alleges that Tidal failed to submit the required notices of intent that are prerequisites to taking advantage of the statutory license under Sec. 115 of the Copyright Act.

The complaint is here:

Yesh Music v. S Carter Enterprises – class action complaint royalties TIDAL.pdf by Mark H. Jaffe

No (un)Original Thoughts

As I’ve often said, reviewing litigation dockets is a great place to learn new things. Instead of focusing on a judge’s final decision, one can often learn more by reading the party’s pleadings, which provide the strongest advocacy for a particular legal position. [caveat–it is critical to read BOTH side’s pleadings]. It is also often the case that a recording artist or songwriter’s contract will be appended to the complaint, providing useful insight not only into the issues in a particular litigation, but towards how the music industry evolves over time. I was reading Rita Ora’s recording contract with Roc Nation–a copy of which can be found here–and I remembered some research I’d done a while ago but never bothered to post here. Specifically, a review of 3 recording contracts executed between 1983 and 1992 demonstrate how public performance for sound recording royalties made their way into major label recording contracts. [caveat–this is not intended to be scientific; it is merely an interesting fact based on the 3 contracts in question]

So, check this out.  In 1983, CBS did *not* have any language about public performance rights in sound recordings—check out the Toto contract below.  By 1989, the language does exist—see 10.04 of the Allman Bros. agreement with CBS reproduced below.  Identical language appears in the Interscope license with Dr. Dre is 1992—see 10.05 of the Dre agreement reproduced below—even though I’m not aware of any relationship between CBS (which was bought by Sony) and Interscope (which was bought by UMG)!

Pre 72 Comparison

The Toto recording contract is below.

Toto 1983 Recording Contract w CBS (Sony)


The Allman Bros. recording contract is below.

Allman Bros Record Contract w CBS 1989

Dr. Dre’s recording agreement is below:

Dre Death Row Records Agreement (1992)

SESACed (the saga continues)

A recent order from Judge Jones in the Eastern District of Pennsylvania provides SESAC some much needed relief, but SESAC still faces a difficult trial.  Readers will recall that the RMLC brought Sherman Act claims against SESAC for allegedly anticompetitive behavior.  Specifically, the RMLC alleged three violations:: § 1—Horizontal Price Fixing (Count I), § 1—Group Boycott/Refusal to Deal (Count II), and § 2—Monopolization (Count III). In response, SESAC filed a motion to dismiss.  Judge Jones threw out the § 1 claims, but denied SESAC’s motion regarding the § 2 (monopolization) claim. 

In analyzing SESAC’s motion to dismiss, the court concluded that the RMLC’s “§1 and §2 claims are based on the confluence of four of SESAC’s licensing practices: SESAC’s blanket license (and its refusal to offer other licensing options), its procurement of a critical mass of must-have works, its de facto exclusive dealing contracts with its affiliates and its lack of transparency as to the works in its repertory.”  Breaking down the 3 alleged violations, the court looked first at the § 1 claims (price fixing and refusal to deal) and concluded that the RMLC had failed to adequately plead a violation.

 A hub-and-spoke conspiracy requires agreements between each spoke and the hub and between and among each of the spokes themselves. Howard Hess Dental Labs., Inc. v. Dentsply Intern., Inc., 602 F.3d 237, 255 (3d Cir. 2010) (“In other words, the ‘rim’ connecting the various ‘spokes’ is missing.”). After reviewing the allegations of agreement and the parties’ respective briefs, the court has concluded that plaintiff has failed to allege sufficient facts from which the court can draw a plausible inference of a hub-and-spoke conspiracy between and among SESAC and its affiliates. In particular, the court agrees with defendants that plaintiff has failed to plead the rim of a hub-and-spoke conspiracy by failing to plausibly allege agreements among SESAC’s affiliates.

Turning next to the § 2 claim (monopoly), the court considered that “Plaintiff alleges that SESAC excludes competitors by obtaining a critical mass of must-have works, selling them exclusively in the blanket license format, discouraging direct licensing by refusing to offer carve-out rights and obscuring the works in its repertory.”  The court found the RMLC had “sufficiently pleaded that SESAC’s lack of transparency exacerbates the exclusionary nature of its conduct by forcing radio stations to purchase the SESAC license even if they do not plan to perform the songs in SESAC’s repertory for fear that they may unwittingly air copyrighted content.”  Looks like this claim is going to be decided by a jury…

The order is below:

 

RMLC v SESAC Antitrust Decision

Gaye Gets in Thicke

Marvin Gaye’s estate has answered Robin Thicke’s declaratory judgment suit over Gaye’s “Got to Give It Up” and Thicke’s uber popular song “Blurred Lines” by filing counterclaims, including alleged infringement of additional Gaye songs, including the Marvin Gaye song, “After the Dance,” in the Thicke song “Love After War.”

Thicke’s own words were used against him, as Gaye’s counterclaim cited a May, 2013 interview Thicke gave GQ magazine in which he said,

Pharrell and I were in the studio and I told him that one of my favorite songs of all time was Marvin Gaye’s ‘Got to Give it Up.’ I was like, ‘Damn, we should make something like that, something with that groove.’ Then he started playing a little something and we literally wrote the song in about a half hour and recorded it.

Thicke repeated this claim in a July interview with Billboard,

Pharrell and I were in the studio making a couple records, and then on the third day I told him I wanted to do something kinda like Marvin Gaye’s ‘Got to Give it Up,’ that kind of feel ’cause it’s one of my favorite songs of all time. So he started messing with some drums and then he started going ‘Hey, hey hey .. ‘ and about an hour and a half later we had the whole record finished.

Frankly, even a cursory listening makes it hard to argue these songs are substantially similar.  The case reminds me of the Vanilla Ice initially claiming that “Ice Ice Baby” didn’t sample Queen / David Bowie’s “Under Pressure.”

The Gaye family alleges that EMI breached its fiduciary duty tp and obligations of good faith and fair dealing with the family by siding with Pharrell Williams, an EMI-affiliated writer and one of Blurred Lines co-writers.  According to the Gaye family, Gaye’s administration agreement with EMI grants EMI the exclusive right to bring infringement claims, but when the Gaye family told EMI about the alleged infringement of Got to Give It Up, EMI refused to pursue a claim against Williams.   

Among the nefarious actions alleged is the salacious claim that the chairman of EMI called a legal representative of the Gaye family suggesting that–notwithstanding the fact that Thicke had already filed his dec action against them–they not to pursue this action because Marvin Gaye’s children were “tarnishing” and “ruining an incredible song” (“Blurred Lines”) and”killing the goose that laid the golden egg,”  The EMI chairman claimed that the Gaye family’s accusations that Blurred Lines was based on Gaye’s song was responsible for “Blurred Lines” not receiving an MTV Video Music Award and might kill any chances of “Blurred Lines” winning a Grammy Award for Song of the Year.

Based on these alleged breaches, the Gaye family is seeking to rescind its publishing agreement with EMI.

The counterclaims are here.